The Federal Trade Commission has broadly relied on Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act (FTC Act) to investigate and enforce against consumer protection violations, including in the context of data privacy and security. Specifically, Section 5 of the FTC Act prohibits unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce. With respect to data privacy and security, the FTC has repeatedly taken the position that under Section 5 of the FTC Act, a company’s failure to implement and maintain appropriate measures to protect consumers’ information may constitute an unfair practice. Likewise, making false or misleading representations (including omissions) about a company’s data privacy and security practices – notably in consumer-facing privacy notices – has been deemed by the FTC to constitute a deceptive trade practice. In its enforcement actions for data privacy and security violations, the FTC has sought – and obtained – both injunctive and equitable monetary relief (e.g., restitution or disgorgement) against companies whose practices violated Section 5 of the FTC Act. But how the FTC obtains equitable monetary relief – and whether it may even continue to do so under Section 13(b) of the FTC Act – is now before the Supreme Court.
Continue Reading How the FTC’s Enforcement of Data Privacy and Security May be Impacted by the U.S. Supreme Court’s Upcoming Review of the FTC’s Use of Section 13(b)